gclaudia:

its-all-science:

Brian Cox - Wonders of the Universe

This video explains some mind-blowing aspects of space. Simple truths, extraordinary facts and a whole lot of information. 

Brian is our generations Carl Sagan.

For one night only, Professor Brian Cox goes unplugged in a specially recorded programme from the lecture theatre of the Royal Institution of Great Britain. In his own inimitable style, Brian takes an audience of famous faces, scientists and members of the public on a journey through some of the most challenging concepts in physics.

With the help of Jonathan Ross, Simon Pegg, Sarah Millican and James May, Brian shows how diamonds - the hardest material in nature - are made up of nothingness; how things can be in an infinite number of places at once; why everything we see or touch in the universe exists; and how a diamond in the heart of London is in communication with the largest diamond in the cosmos.

sweetcalamity:

Brian Cox: What really goes on at the Large Hadron Collider

this makes me so happy

sephencolberumblr:

Brian Cox: There’s a number in the series which is the oldest thing we can imagine. Which is the point in the universe when all the black holes - so that the collapsed stars evaporate away to nothingness and the number is 10 to the power of 100 years. That’s 1 with a hundred naughts. Just to illustrate how big that number is: if I started counting with atoms, so I took an atom from the table, took 1, 2, 3, and started counting. Then I’d run out of atoms on the Earth very quickly. Then I’d start counting the atoms that make up the stars. There are a hundred billion stars in the Milky Way Galaxy, three hundred billion galaxies in the observable universe. I would still run out of atoms. There are not enough atoms in the entire observable universe to count up to that number which is the oldest - the age of the oldest thing we can imagine in science. So it’s quite a big story, as you say, in a small book. You’re right there. Stephen Colbert: Brian Cox, will you lie on a hillside with me at night? Stare up at the sky. I got a chill and I don’t know what you’re talking about. That was really beautiful. 

sephencolberumblr:

Brian Cox: There’s a number in the series which is the oldest thing we can imagine. Which is the point in the universe when all the black holes - so that the collapsed stars evaporate away to nothingness and the number is 10 to the power of 100 years. That’s 1 with a hundred naughts. Just to illustrate how big that number is: if I started counting with atoms, so I took an atom from the table, took 1, 2, 3, and started counting. Then I’d run out of atoms on the Earth very quickly. Then I’d start counting the atoms that make up the stars. There are a hundred billion stars in the Milky Way Galaxy, three hundred billion galaxies in the observable universe. I would still run out of atoms. There are not enough atoms in the entire observable universe to count up to that number which is the oldest - the age of the oldest thing we can imagine in science. So it’s quite a big story, as you say, in a small book. You’re right there. 
Stephen Colbert: Brian Cox, will you lie on a hillside with me at night? Stare up at the sky. I got a chill and I don’t know what you’re talking about. That was really beautiful. 

incomprehensibleuniverse:

Brian Cox: What really goes on at the Large Hadron Collider